Hispanics face more barriers to the census than a citizenship question: Readers sound off

Barriers to census transcend ‘citizenship question’

Letter to the editor:

The decision by the Trump administration to continue pursuing the citizenship question on the census is concerning for our democracy. Litigation will delay the census, which can lead to an undercount, especially for Latinos.

This will be the first digital census. As reported by the Pew Research Center, 61% of Latinos have home broadband access. What’s more, according to the Brennan Center for Justice, the Census Bureau is underfunded. This results in less resources for field offices and community groups, critical in making sure people complete the form.

Census letter. (Photo: Michelle R. Smith/AP)

Our foundation works with health clinics, small business owners and nonprofits to secure an accurate count. We’ve one opportunity every 10 years to do it right. Our political representation and federal resources depend on it.

Jacqueline Martinez Garcel and Christian Arana, The Latino Community Foundation; San Francisco

Politicians play the expectations game

Letter to the editor:

We should never underestimate the rhetorical power of politicians to alter our expectations — expectations that then can cause them to be evaluated more positively in the future.

A note to Democrats in 2020: Republican: I’m telling Democrats how to beat Trump in 2020. It’s Job One so get over it.

President Donald Trump is a master and beneficiary of this communication tactic. His speeches and Tweets set such a low standard of conduct that the news media fall into his trap, feeling compelled to declare he sounds “presidential” on those rare occasions when he doesn’t lie or say something divisive. The response to Trump’s Fourth of July speech offers an example of the press’ misguided tendency. It makes no sense that Trump is praised for sounding normal when he’s minimally doing his job.

This is a sad time for the presidency. It also is a sad time for the news media, whose responses play right into Trump’s hand.

Richard Cherwitz, Professor at the University of Texas; Austin, Texas

Soccer champs: Prideful or US pride?

Alienating half of soccer fans won’t gain equal pay. I’m done with the U.S. Women’s National Team.

— Roger Metcalf

Very few men realize the influence this team has on our young women. They did well.

— Ronald Thompson

She’s all that: Opinion: Megan Rapinoe embodies all the swagger, fearlessness of the US World Cup team

Megan Rapinoe (Photo: Taylor Jones/ Mount Dora, FL/PoliticalCartoons.com)

The team confronted the issues that have roiled our society — gender equity, sexism, national values — head on, ensuring these much-needed conversations continue.

— Brian Daley

The players interjected politics and personal opinions into a sporting event. Stand for the national anthem and salute our flag if you want Americans to cheer for you.

— John James

Trump ends ‘citizenship question’ effort

Rather than add a citizenship question to the 2020 census, President Donald Trump ordered the Commerce Department on Thursday to gather the data about immigration status through other means.

Trump did nothing more than pander to his base by threatening to take executive action. This “question” issue is 100% politics and 0% meaningful.

— Scott Hardy

Census question battle: Hey Donald Trump, another court just saw through your census citizenship question charade

Whether or not it’s uncovered through the census, we have every right to know how many citizens and noncitizens live in our country.

— Rich Farrell

If Trump’s objective were to greatly reduce the number of returned census forms, this action would’ve done it.

— Mary Melcher

Acosta under fire for Epstein case 

Secretary of Labor Alex Acosta announced his resignation on Friday. He was under fire because of a plea deal made a decade ago with financier Jeffrey Epstein while Acosta served as a Miami federal prosecutor. Epstein was recently charged with sex trafficking minors.

Tons of rich and powerful men are in danger of being involved in this, so I suspect this will somehow go away.

Rob Anderson

Former Labor Secretary Alex Acosta held a news conference at the Department of Labor, July 10, 2019, in Washington about his role in the decade-old Jeffrey Epstein sex abuse case. (Photo: Alex Brandon, AP)

Thankfully, President Donald Trump hasn’t called for Acosta’s resignation without understanding all the facts, unlike the Democratic leadership.

John Culbertson

This came up in Acosta’s Senate confirmation hearing, yet he was approved.

— Tim Grisham

Trump achieves his best approval rating

According to a recently conducted poll by The Washington Post and ABC News, 44% of people say they approve of President Donald Trump.

But the disapproval rating is 53%.

— Scott Hardy

This is because of two major issues that Americans are happy about: the economy and court-approved, legal deportations.

— Carol Lynn Straub

I still haven’t heard a reason why I should vote for a Democrat. Trump will win a second term.

— Garth Hogan

President Trump and the Fourth of July

President Donald Trump addressed the country in his “Salute to America” speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington on Thursday.

Trump spoke about the Constitution, a document he doesn’t believe in and doesn’t follow.

—  Walt Stasinski

Why Democrats are upset about July Fourth: The real reason why the left was against Donald Trump’s July 4 speech

At one point, I thought, “Who is he, and what have they done with Trump?” That’s because he acted as a real president, not as his normal self. Shame he can’t do that the rest of the time.

—  Julius Cheng

Trump rally (Photo: John Darkow/ Columbia Missourian/PoliticalCartoons.com)

As a Vietnam War veteran and retired military, I thought this celebration was fantastic. I believe it was nonpolitical.

—  Jim Adcock

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